Felipe Montoro Jens On The Pitfalls Of Brazil’s Infrastructure

Improving Brazil’s dwindling economic state is of paramount importance. A recent study released by the National Confederation of Industry revealed that if Brazil’s poor infrastructure persists, their nation will cease to exist. According to the National Confederation of Industry, 2017 was abysmal for Brazil. From abandoning 517 infrastructure jobs to losing nearly $11 billion as a result of said terminations, Brazil reached the nadir of their sufferings last year. The majority of these terminated jobs were basic sanitation works, with highways, airports, and railways following close behind. Perhaps the most unsettling reality of Brazil’s ongoing issues is that they don’t seem keen to eradicate them. More about Felipe Montoro Jens at infomoney.com

Upon releasing these statistics, Brazil received an outpouring of concern and advice, primarily from economists and experts. Felipe Montoro Jens is one such individual who took a sincere interest in Brazil’s current fiasco. As a project analyst, Jens had no problem discerning the factors that precipitated Brazil’s disastrous state. In fact, Jens pinned Brazil’s critical condition on the following setbacks: issues with land ownership regulations, technical difficulties, inadequate micro planning procedures, conflicts between managers and workers, and insufficient training. Fortunately, Jens maintains that there lies a solution to each of these problems.

According to Felipe Montoro Jens, the following adjustments will bode well for Brazil’s future: improved micro and macro planning strategies, mandatory training, balanced contractual agreements, and strengthened managerial controls. If Brazil continues to disregard the wealth of advice they’ve been offered, specialists forecast a dismal outcome. Jose Augusto Fernandes with the National Confederation of Industry is particularly peeved by Brazil’s negligence. Given his contribution to the aforementioned study, Fernandes is well aware of how often Brazil throws caution to the wind. Their “inability to learn from their losses” is what Fernandes finds most distressing. Only time will tell if Brazil will spark much-needed reform.

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